Think 360 Arts is Hiring

Think 360 Arts for Learning is seeking a Program Assistant. The Program Assistant is responsible for supporting the successful implementation of Think 360 Arts educational and professional development programs. This position reports to the Program Director and works closely with the Executive Director and all of the Think 360 Arts support staff.

Visit the full job description page for all the details.

Think 360 Arts for Learning Announces Jennifer Olson as Executive Director

Think 360 Arts for Learning Announces Jennifer Olson as Executive Director

Olson, previously with the Pasadena Unified School District, will begin her new role on June 11

DENVER (May 3, 2018) – Beginning on June 11, Jennifer Olson, previously the arts education coordinator at Pasadena Unified School District, will take over as the executive director of Think 360 Arts for Learning (Think 360 Arts).

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Arts Integration: A Historical Perspective

By Think 360 Artist, Andrea Pakieser

700 years ago, the culture of Renaissance humanism flourished, inspiring new educational approaches that diverged from the dogmatic utilitarianism of Medieval Europe. Guided by the belief that education could improve society, Renaissance-era teachers trained their students in poetry, mathematics, music, astronomy…a novel combination of traditional academic subjects and the arts. We still use the expression “Renaissance man/woman” today to refer to someone whose talents span a wide variety of fields.

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The Cost of Arts Education

By Kristi Jones

The arts have always been in my life, and I consider myself extremely lucky to be able to say that. However, I didn’t have super artistic parents; in fact, art wasn’t really even a hobby for my parents. My dad is a pilot and was always more math and science-minded, and my mom had a varied career history, including accounting, marketing and flight attendant, but the arts were never involved in their professional lives, and besides my mom playing the piano now and then, not in their personal lives either. However, they always encouraged both my involvement in and appreciation of the arts. I started taking dance classes when I was three, and my parents started taking me to the theatre productions when I was around six years old. There were museums, piano lessons and choir concerts throughout my life. I also had the typical arts classes in school, stayed involved in choir, theatre and dance through my teenage years, went on to major in theatre in college and moved on to have a career in the non-profit arts world. Why? I was encouraged to participate in the arts, where I ended up finding my niche and passion, and I was given the support and tools I needed to do just that.

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The Impact of Common Core Standards on Arts Education

Written by Jennifer M. DiBella, Director of Education at Roundabout Theatre Company

(This essay was adapted from an article originally featured in TCG’s Special Report on Education 2012: Arts Education at the Core (PDF). That report shares findings from the over 100 theatres that participated in the TCG Education Survey 2012, along with essays from leading theatre education directors on the impact of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) on arts education, and CCSS resources from the past year.)

Created by state education leaders and governors from 48 states, the Common Core is the largest effort in the United States to develop a set of unified standards intended to equip students with the knowledge and skills required to succeed in college and careers.  A popular refrain from Common Core advocates is “fewer, higher, deeper” — in essence the main shift from previous standards is to offer a reduced number of more rigorous standards.  The Core has been met with mixed reactions from educators around the nation.  Some are excited about the emphasis on deep critical thinking and others find the new mandates and benchmarks to be cumbersome and confusing.  When it comes to the connection between Common Core and the arts, there is a lot to be explored.

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Why We Need Arts Education Now More Than Ever

By Tami LoSasso

It’s a tired story. Funding in education is cut, channeled to nationally backed reform efforts, or school enrollment shrinks along with budgets for teachers and programs. We all know the reasons why the arts are the first to take a hit: they can’t be measured on a test, they’re too subjective, they’re not impacting learning in the core classroom, and too many are not skills based. While some of that may be true some of it is also blatantly false. For example, a 2016 report issued by Americans for the Arts stated,

“Data from The College Board show that in 2015, students who took four years of arts and music classes while in high school scored an average of 92 points higher on their SATs than students who took only one-half year or less.” (1)

Additional research with school age child development shows “a group of 162 children, ages 9-10, were trained to look closely at works of art and reason about what they saw. The results showed that children’s ability to draw inferences about artwork transferred to their reasoning about images in science.”(2)

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